Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Hazardous Area Classifications in the USA

Hazardous Area Classifications
Understanding Hazardous Area classifications is critical.
An important aspect of safe installation is to determine the hazardous area classification in the area. Checking the area classification is also important for safe electrical wiring. The hazardous area classification should be known by personnel before starting work in an area.

Hazardous areas refer to locations with a possible risk of explosion or fire due to dangerous atmosphere. The hazards can be associated with flammable vapors or gases, ignitable fibers, and combustible dusts.

Different hazardous area classifications exist in the North America and Europe. Generally, the National Electric Code (NEC) classifications govern hazardous areas in the US. While in Europe, hazardous area classification has been specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

CLASS
NATURE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
CLASS I
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable vapors or gases in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include natural gas and liquified petroleum.
CLASS II
Hazardous area due the presence of conductive or combustible dusts in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include aluminum and magnesium powders.
CLASS III
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable fibers or other flying debris that collect around lighting fixtures, machinery, and other areas in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include sawdust and flyings



Division groups hazardous areas based on the chances of an explosion due to the presence of flammable materials in the area.

DIVISION
LIKELIHOOD OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
DIVISION 1
Areas where there is a high chance of an explosion due to hazardous material that is present periodically, intermittently, or continuously under normal operation.
DIVISION 2
Areas where there is a low chance of an explosion under normal operation.


Group categorizes areas based on the type of flammable or ignitable materials in the environment. As per NEC guidelines, Groups A to D classify gasses while Groups E to G classify dust and flying debris.
GROUP
TYPE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN THE AREA
GROUP A
Acetylene.
GROUP B
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value equal to or less than 0.40
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value equal to or less than 0.45 mm
  • Combustible gas with more than 30 percent volume
Examples include hydrogen, ethylene oxide, acrolein, propylene oxide.

GROUP C
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value between 0.40 and 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, ether, cyclopropane, morphline, acetaldehyde, isoprene, and ethylene.

GROUP D
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value greater than 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include ammonia, gasoline, butane, benzene, hexane, ethanol, methane, methanol, natural gas, propane, naphtha, and vinyl chloride.

GROUP E
Area contains metal dusts such as magnesium, aluminum, chromium, bronze, titanium, zinc, and other combustible dusts whose abrasiveness, size, and conductivity present a hazard.

GROUP F
Area contains carbonaceous dusts such as charcoal, coal black, carbon black, coke dusts and others that present an explosion hazard.
GROUP G
Area contains combustible dusts not classified in Groups E and F.
Examples include starch, grain, flour, wood, plastic, sugar, and chemicals.


NOTE: This post serves only as a guide to acquaint the reader with hazardous area classifications in the USA. It is imperative to discuss your instrumentation, valve, or process equipment requirement with a qualified applications expert prior to installing any electrical device inside of any hazardous area.

800-288-7926 

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Flowserve Valtek Control Valve Packing Adjustments


Flowserve Valtek offers packing in many different types, styles, and materials for a wide range of applications. One thing they all have in common is that they require periodic adjustment to ensure optimal performance. Adjusting packing is a necessary and important valve maintenance practice. Neglecting packing can lead to a leak path formation that may be impossible to repair without packing replacement. Packing leaks should be addressed as soon as possible to ensure safety and optimal reliability. This video demonstrates basic packing adjustments and procedures.

For more information about Flowserve Valtek valves, contact Swanson Flo by calling 800-288-7926 or by visiting https://swansonflo.com.

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Wireless Networking in Industrial Plants

Wireless Networking in Industrial Plants
Wireless networking serves as the ideal alternative to high-cost industrial wiring. The setup also provides superior performance, solving the problem of electrical surges that result from field wiring.

Using a wireless system can result in an efficient supply of networking resources to field devices. The system facilitates an effective exchange of data between the host server and the field devices in the industrial setting.

Only a few industry-grade wireless field sensors have been offered so far in the year 2019. The reason for this is mainly a lack of information regarding its benefits. Once the cost-saving aspects of wireless networking become known in the industrial setting, it will likely spur the demand in the market and lead to an influx of innovative wireless devices for different field applications.

Benefits of Wireless Networking Systems in the Industrial Setting Explored 

Wireless technologies offer great value over wired solutions. A reduction in cost is just one of the many benefits of switching to the wireless networking system. There are many benefits, including enhanced management of legacy systems that were previously not possible with a wired networking connection.

Here is an overview of some of the value-added benefits of adopting wireless networking in industrial plants.

Reduced Installation Costs 

Savings in installation costs is the key benefit of a wireless networking system. The cost of installing a wireless solution is significantly lower as compared to its wired counterpart.

Installing a wireless network requires less planning. Extensive surveys are not required to route the wires to control rooms. This reduced installation cost is the main reason industrial setups should consider going wireless instead of having a wired networking system.

Improved Information Accuracy 

Adopting wireless networking also results in improved accuracy of information. The wireless system is not prone to interferences. As a result, the system ensures consistent and timely transfer of information from one node to another.

Enhanced Flexibility 

Enhanced flexibility is another reason for deploying wireless networking solutions in an industrial setting. Additional points can be awarded easily in an incremental manner. The wireless system can also integrate with legacy systems without any issues.

Operational Efficiencies

Migrating to wireless networking can help in improving operational efficiencies as well. Plant managers can troubleshoot and diagnose issues more easily. The system facilitates predictive maintenance by allowing the monitoring of remote assets.

Human Safety 

Another critical factor that should influence the decision to migrate to wireless networking is the human safety factor. Wireless technologies allow safer operations, reducing exposure to harmful environments. For instance, a wireless system can be used in taking a reading and adjusting valves without having to go to the problematic area to take measurements.

Efficient Information Transfer

Another advantage is that the time required to reach a device is reduced. This results in a more efficient transfer of information between network segments that are geographically separated. The industry wireless networking standards use IP addresses to allow remote access to data from field devices.

With wireless networking systems, readings can be taken more frequently that can help in early detection and reduction of possible incidents.

Wireless Networking Standards for Industrial Plants

The ISO100 standards committee has introduced a whole set of new standards for wireless communication in industries. The first standards include the ISA100.11 that pertains to processing data transfer while fulfilling limited control needs in the industries.

Wireless Networking in Industrial Plants
Hybrid architecture using WirelessHART mesh networking coupled
with ultra-efficient BLE Instrument Area Networks.
Image courtesy of Foxboro Schneider Electric.
ANSI and ISA have adopted the ISA100.11a standards for wireless communication in process industries. However, the standard has yet to pass through the international IEC standardization. This is due to the fact that ISA100.11a and IEC’s WirelessHART standards address the same market.

Technical Basis 

ISA100.11a is based on IEEE 802.15.4:2006 standard, similar to WirelessHART with 15 to 16 channels in the ISM band 2.4GHz range. However, the former can be used for a wider networking application in the industrial sector such as peer-to-peer messaging and network segmentation.

Distinct Hopping Patterns

Each segment in the network may use a distinct hopping pattern, unlike the WirelessHART. Moreover, the network segment has a dedicated time slot that results in the formation of large networks with overlapping segments.

Mesh Networking 

Another important point to note is that the ISA1001.11a wireless networking standard for industrial process makes use of mesh networking, which is similar to WirelessHART. However, the standard also allows devices at the network’s edge to not route information to different devices. This results in increased security that prevents unauthorized access to networks.

While not being technically different, the details of the two standards set them apart. However, the IS100.12 is already in development, and it will reduce the divergence in specifications between WirelessHART and ISA100.11a.

Challenges in Adopting Industrial Wireless Networking

Industrial wireless communication technology is a work in progress. A lot of work is required to address specific technical challenges for adopting the networking solution. Some of the challenges include evaluation and communication of the wireless technologies that are available for industrial concerns.

Another challenge in the adoption of wireless technology is solving the issues of latency or time synchronization. This is important to ensure the reliability of data transferred in the industrial setting.

Based on the challenges identified, here are three key suggestions for implementing wireless technology in the industrial setting.

  • Create a science-based methodology for measuring the performance of wireless communication
  • Create guidelines for the deployment of wireless networking in an industrial environment
  • Address issues of latency in systems with high-reliability aspects with error rates less than 10 percent

Key Takeaway

Wireless networking is an enabling technology that can result in improved operational efficiency in the industrial systems. The technology can improve control and safety and lead to enhanced cost savings.

Adoption of the wireless networking system creates huge potential for increased operational efficiencies. The system can reduce installation cost, enable enhanced monitoring, reduce risks, and improve profitability.

For more information on industrial wireless networking, contact Swanson Flo by calling 800-288-7926 or by visiting https://swansonflo.com.

Friday, April 26, 2019

Swanson Flo Has You Covered


Founded in 1960, Swanson Flo has long maintained our position as an industry leader in process automation with unmatched project success leveraging industry preferred products and services. Our mission is to provide innovative process control solutions for engineers, managers and maintenance professionals through quality equipment and experienced application engineering.

Swanson Flo
https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Monday, April 22, 2019

An Excellent Industrial Valve Glossary for the New Engineer, Technician, Maintenance Person or Buyer


Here's a great resource (courtesy of Jordan Valve) for the new process engineer, plant maintenance person, industrial valve buyer, or service technician. This document is called "A Glossary of 864 Valve Terms". This may be the most comprehensive valve glossary we've ever seen. We hope you find it useful.


Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Attend the 2019 BioFuels Automation University Ethanol Maintenance Classes

The 2019 BioFuels Automation University schedule is now released. Interested parties should review the course itineraries and plan to attend.

BioFuels Automation University provides Best Practice Certification courses designed to enable participants to learn directly from some of the industry’s top technical professionals and gain valuable hands-on training to best utilize the technology driving your facilities.

Ethanol Maintenance 101


A strong combination of concepts and best practice Hands-on Training – this course really delivers for insight and troubleshooting skills for instrumentation and valve technologies. BioFuels Automation University experts stand ready to help define your needs and craft a customized program.

Two Sessions available in 2019:
  • Jun 20 - 21, 8:00 AM 
  • Oct 24 - 25, 8:00 AM
Day One: Instrumentation - Flow Measurement, Temperature Measurement, Pressure Measurement, Level Measurement, Electro-Chemical Measurement

Day Two: Valves - Automated On/Off Valves, Valve Monitors, Control Valves, Positioners, Communication Protocols, Shop Tools - Hands On

Fee: $1,350 per participant. Fee includes lodging and meals. Payment information required to complete registration.

Location: BioFuels Automation University Training Center, 151 Cheshire Lane, North Plymouth, Minnesota


Ethanol Maintenance 201


All devices and technologies from 101 will covered in-depth at the master technician level. Course structure is 80% hands-on and centered around your specific plant needs. To maximize the impact of this course, extensive application challenges as well as Q&A sessions are conducted. BioFuels Automation University experts stand ready to help define your needs and craft a customized program.

This class will take you through an analysis of the complete control loop, providing you with a deeper understanding of the relationship between the three segments of a control loop. Sensing Element, PID Controller, Final Control Element, C (control) DCS, I and V.

Two Sessions available in 2019:
  • July 25 - 26, 8:00 AM
  • Dec 05 - 06, 8:00 AM
Space Limited to 10 participants for maximum comprehension. Class led by highly experienced service professionals, 80% hands-on practical application.

Topics covered: Loop Configurations, Controller PID Tuning: Theory and Practical Application Instruments, Advanced Valves

Fee: $2,250 per participant. Fee includes lodging and meals. Payment information required to complete registration.

Location: BioFuels Automation University Training Center, 151 Cheshire Lane, North Plymouth, Minnesota.

Sunday, March 31, 2019

The Flowserve Valtek MaxFlo 4 Eccentric Rotary Plug Control Valve

The Flowserve Valtek MaxFlo 4 control valve is a high performance eccentric rotary plug valve designed for the process industry. It features a large capacity, standard hardened trim and superior shaft blow-out protection. This valve is available in sizes 1 through 12 inches, ASME Class 150, 300 and 600 as well as DIN PN 10, PN16, PN 25, PN40 and PN63.

An optional ISA 75.08.01 or DIN EN 558 series 1 long-pattern body makes this valve an easy drop-in replacement for a globe control valve.

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Schneider Electric Foxboro Pressure Transmitter Models 05S/10S/50S


Available in absolute pressure, differential pressure and gauge pressure, the new Schneider Electric Foxboro Models 05S/10S/50S pressure transmitters are designed to make your process more profitable by giving you the opportunity to select your transmitter at the best ratio of performance/price for your application.

Innovative FoxCal™ technology, accuracy expressed as a percentage of reading, 400:1 turndown, Safety SIL2 certification, are some of the exceptional features in the 05S/10S/50S family.
For more information, contact:

Swanson Flo
https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Types of Electrical Connectors Used for Hamilton Process Analytics Sensors

VP – This is a common connector used throughout the Hamilton sensor product line. VP is abbreviation for “VarioPin”. The VP designation often includes a number referring to the number of exposed poles on connector head. Example VP6 = 6 pole.





K8 connectors are typically used on pH / ORP sensors which lack temperature compensation. These connectors have a two pole design comprised of the center core and outer metallic threaded connection.




S7 & S8 – S7 and S8 connectors are typically found on sensors which no temperature compensation. They are the same basic design however S8 connectors have PG13.5 mounting threads, while S7 connectors do not. These connectors are recessed thus care must be taken to avoid moisture getting trapped which could lead to a short circuit.




M12 - Metallic threaded M12 connectors are found on Dissolved Oxygen Sensors and Cell Density products. M12 adapters have either 4 or 8 poles hidden within the socket. Since the poles are recessed avoid getting moisture inside the connection.





T82 – The T82 connector is sometimes known as a D4 connector. It uses a twist lock design to secure the cable to the sensor. These connectors are less common.





Memosens – These inductive electrical connectors are only found on digital pH sensors using Memosens technology. They use a twist lock design to affix the cable. There are no exposed metallic
connections on Memosens connectors.


For more information on Hamilton ProcessAnalytics contact Swanson Flo.
https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Changing the Trim on the Jordan / LowFlow Mark 708 Series Control Valve


The LowFlow Mark 708 is a very popular and accurate control available for fractional flow services: whether for pilot plant installations, test stands, R & D facilities or for specialized processes such as dosing, injection and venting applications. This video demonstrates how to change the trim on the Jordan / LowFlow Mark 708 Series Control Valve.

Swanson Flo
https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

A Visual Understanding of Steam Induced Water Hammer


When improperly drained of condensate in a high pressure steam main fills with condensate and completely surrounds the steam, an implosion takes place causing devastating water hammer.

Draining condensate and keeping it away from the steam by using proper steam trapping equipment will prevent this from happening.

The following video, courtesy of TLV, dramatically demonstrates the principle behind water hammer and its potentially devastating effects.

Swanson Flo
https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Flowserve Valves - Kammer Control Valves

Kammer Control ValvesFLOWSERVE Kämmer manufactures special application and general service control valves and actuators, which are used extensively in the chemical, petrochemical, power, petroleum, pulp & paper, pharmaceutical, food processing and cryogenic industries.

FLOWSERVE Kämmer pneumatic actuators are widely known for their versatile diaphragm design, easy installation and simplified maintenance. When compared to other manufacturers’ diaphragm actuator designs, Kämmer actuators have much higher thrust capabilities, feature a very compact design and are lighter in weight. They also feature a field reversible design that requires no additional parts.

Download the Kammer Control Valve Product Profile Here

Monday, January 21, 2019

Mounting the Logix 3800 Digital Positioner on the Valtek Mark One Linear Control Valve


Compatible with linear and rotary valves and actuators, the Logix 3800 digital positioner offers industry-leading embedded measurement, data reduction and diagnostic functionalities. It  features powerful diagnostics that identify field problems and expedite corrective actions to ensure reduced return-to-operation times.

The Valtek Mark One globe control valve offers superior performance in liquid and gaseous services, while also permitting easy, fast and inexpensive maintenance.

This video details how to mount the Logix 3800 positioner on the Mark One valve.

For more information about Flowserve valve and valve automation products, contact Swanson Flo by calling 800-288-7926 or visit their website at https://swansonflo.com.