Showing posts with label Foxboro. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Foxboro. Show all posts

Friday, February 16, 2018

Introduction to Industrial Control Systems

Industrial Control Systems Control systems are computer-based systems that are used by many infrastructures and industries to monitor and control sensitive processes and physical functions. Typically, control systems collect sensor measurements and operational data from the field, process and display this information, and relay control commands to local or remote equipment. In the electric power industry they can manage and control the transmission and delivery of electric power, for example, by opening and closing circuit breakers and setting thresholds for preventive shutdowns. Employing integrated control systems, the oil and gas industry can control the refining operations on a plant site as well as remotely monitor the pressure and flow of gas pipelines and control the flow and pathways of gas transmission. In water utilities, they can remotely monitor well levels and control the wells’ pumps; monitor flows, tank levels, or pressure in storage tanks; monitor water quality characteristics, such as pH, turbidity, and chlorine residual; and control the addition of chemicals. Control system functions vary from simple to complex; they can be used to simply monitor processes—for example, the environmental conditions in a small office building—or manage most activities in a municipal water system or even a nuclear power plant.

Industrial Control SystemsIn certain industries such as chemical and power generation, safety systems are typically implemented to mitigate a disastrous event if control and other systems fail. In addition, to guard against both physical attack and system failure, organizations may establish back-up control centers that include uninterruptible power supplies and backup generators.

There are two primary types of control systems. Distributed Control Systems (DCS) typically are Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems typically are used for large, geographically dispersed distribution operations. A utility company may use a DCS to generate power and a SCADA system to distribute it.

process instruments
Field devices and discreet controllers used in control systems
(Foxboro Schneider Electric).
A control system typically consists of a “master” or central supervisory control and monitoring station consisting of one or more human-machine interfaces where an operator can view status information about the remote sites and issue commands directly to the system. Typically, this station is located at a main site along with application servers and an engineering workstation that is used to configure and troubleshoot the other control system components. The supervisory control and monitoring station is typically connected to local controller stations through a hard- wired network or to remote controller stations through a communications network—which could be the Internet, a public switched telephone network, or a cable or wireless (e.g. radio, microwave, or Wi-Fi) network. Each controller station has a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), DCS controller, or other controller that communicates with the supervisory control and monitoring station. The controller stations also include sensors and control equipment that connect directly with the working components of the infrastructure—for example, pipelines, water towers, and power lines. The sensor takes readings from the infrastructure equipment—such as water or pressure levels, electrical voltage or current—and sends a message to the controller. The controller may be programmed to determine a course of action and send a message to the control equipment instructing it what to do—for example, to turn off a valve or dispense a chemical. If the controller is not programmed to determine a course of action, the controller communicates with the supervisory control and monitoring station before sending a command back to the control equipment. The control system also can be programmed to issue alarms back to the operator when certain conditions are detected. Handheld devices, such as personal digital assistants, can be used to locally monitor controller stations. Experts report that technologies in controller stations are becoming more intelligent and automated and communicate with the supervisory central monitoring and control station less frequently, requiring less human intervention.

Swanson Flo can help you with control system questions or challenges. Reach them by calling 800-288-7926 or visiting

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Foxboro Magnetic Flowmeter for Chemical and Process Industries

Based on Faraday’s law of induction, Foxboro magnetic meters are a reliable  ow measurement solution with a lower cost of ownership and maintenance, as well as  eld-proven stability to maximize the availability of  ow measurement.

With a wide range of liners and electrodes, the 9700A  owtube is ideal for the Chemical and Process industries. In combination with the IMT30A, IMT31A and IMT33A transmitters, Foxboro offers an innovative solution designed to meet the demands for all chemical applications such as:
  • Clean liquids
  • Mixing of chemicals
  • Demanding applications including corrosive, abrasive liquids • Rapid variation of the pH value
  • For slurries and pastes with high solids content
  • Drilling applications, mining slurries with large particles

See the embedded brochure below, or download your own PDF from this Swanson Flo link.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Schneider Electric Foxboro Measurement and Control Product Catalog

Measurement and Control Product CatalogSchneider Electric / Foxboro provides customers a complete solution - from instruments in the field to the control room - to enable customers to optimize their assets-people, equipment, plant. With a history of innovation, Foxboro Field Devices provides solutions across a wide range of industries, including Energy, Oil, Gas & Refining, Renewable Fuels, Nutrition And Life Sciences, Process Automation, Water & Wastewater.

Foxboro / Schneider Electric range of products in Measurement and Instrumentation include:
  • Flow
  • Level
  • Pressure
  • Process Liquid Analytical
  • Temperature
  • Control
  • Data Acquisition & Configurator
  • Pneumatic
  • Valve Positioners
  • Accutech
Visit this page on the Swanson Flo website to download your full PDF version.

You can easily specify many instruments and accessories described in this catalog. Sections covering our most popular items include all the technical data you need to know for most applications. To specify the appropriate item, simply follow the step-by-step procedure at the end of each description. Please feel free to contact Swanson Flo for help.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Magnetic Flowmeters (Magmeters): Principles and Applications

Magnetic flowmeter
Magnetic flowmeter (Foxboro)
Crucial aspects of process control include the ability to accurately determine qualities and quantities of materials. In terms of appraising and working with fluids (such as liquids, steam, and gases) the flowmeter is a staple tool, with the simple goal of expressing the delivery of a subject fluid in a quantified manner. Measurement of media flow velocity can be used, along with other conditions, to determine volumetric or mass flow. The magnetic flowmeter, also called a Magmeter, is one of several technologies used to measure fluid flow.

In general, magnetic flowmeters are sturdy, reliable devices able to withstand hazardous environments while returning precise measurements to operators of a wide variety of processes. The magnetic flowmeter has no moving parts. The operational principle of the device is powered by Faraday's Law, a fundamental scientific understanding which states that a voltage will be induced across any conductor moving at a right angle through a magnetic field, with the voltage being proportional to the velocity of the conductor. The principle allows for an inherently hard-to-measure quality of a substance to be expressed via the Magmeter. In a Magmeter application, the meter produces the magnetic field referred to in Faraday's Law. The conductor is the fluid. The actual measurement of a magnetic flowmeter is the induced voltage corresponding to fluid velocity. This can be used to determine volumetric flow and mass flow when combined with other measurements.

The magnetic flowmeter technology is not impacted by temperature, pressure, or density of the subject fluid. It is however, necessary to fill the entire cross section of the pipe in order to derive useful volumetric flow measurements. Faraday's Law relies on conductivity, so the fluid being measured has to be electrically conductive. Many hydrocarbons are not sufficiently conductive for a flow measurement using this method, nor are gases.

Magmeters apply Faraday's law by using two charged magnetic coils; fluid passes through the magnetic field produced by the coils. A precise measurement of the voltage generated in the fluid will be proportional to fluid velocity. The relationship between voltage and flow is theoretically a linear expression, yet some outside factors may present barriers and complications in the interaction of the instrument with the subject fluid. These complications include a higher amount of voltage in the liquid being processed, and coupling issues between the signal circuit, power source, and/or connective leads of both an inductive and capacitive nature.

In addition to salient factors such as price, accuracy, ease of use, and the size-scale of the flowmeter in relation to the fluid system, there are multiple reasons why Magmeters are the unit of choice for certain applications. They are resistant to corrosion, and can provide accurate measurement of dirty fluids - making them suitable for wastewater measurement. As mentioned, there are no moving parts in a Magmeter, keeping maintenance to a minimum. Power requirements are also low. Instruments are available in a wide range of configurations, sizes, and construction materials to accommodate various process installation requirements.

As with all process measurement instruments, proper selection, configuration, and installation are the real keys to a successful project. Share your flow measurement challenges of all types with a process measurement specialist, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

The video below provides additional information about magnetic flowmeters.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Foxboro Field Device Capability

Foxboro instrumentation
Foxboro Process Instruments
For decades, the Foxboro brand has driven the development of various breakthrough measurement technologies: The first d/p cell, the dual-phase Digital Coriolis Mass Flowmeter, the DolpHinTM pH Sensor, and the Magnetic Flowmeter.

Foxboro instrumentation sets the industry standard for performance in a wide variety of measurement technologies:
  • Pressure transmitters that provide best-in-class accuracy levels and the longest standard and optional warranties in the industry 
  • Flowmeter technolgies: Magnetic, Vortex shedding and Coriolis that provide unparalleled solution for liquids, gases and steam 
  • Process analytical sensors that revolutionize pH and conductivity measurement 
  • Temperature transmitters providing accurate and reliable measurements in the harshest of environments 
  • Level measurement including LevelStar Buoyancy and LevelWave Radar devices for the widest choice of installation and applications 
  • Accutech provides wireless measurements where traditional instruments struggle with operation and budget goals 
Foxboro instruments provide accurate, reliable measurement and analysis of pressure, ow, level, and process analytical variables so you have the process control you need for maximum integration and interoperability - all at competitive prices, low cost of ownership, and 24-hour worldwide support from a single source.

For more information on Foxboro Field Instruments, visit Swanson Flo or call 800-288-7926.