Friday, March 30, 2018

Swanson Flo Performance - Full Capability Instrumentation and Valve Service & Repair

In-house repair as well as field service capabilities for process measurement and control.

Swanson Flo Performance supports every process control customer with region-based, full-capability service and repair. Both in-house and in-field. Built on more than 50 years of applications experience and technical knowledge.

  • From valves and instruments to actuation, fabrication and preventative maintenance. 
  • Our technicians are factory-certified. 
  • Shop is factory audited.
  • Total service for process measurement and control
  • Valve actuation facilities – the "Center of Excellence"
  • Instrument calibration, repair, and trouble-shooting services
Call 800-288-7926 or visit https://swansonflo.com


Monday, March 26, 2018

Limitorque MX Actuator Users Instructions, Maintenance, and Spare Parts Manual

Flowserve Limitorque MX
The Flowserve Limitorque MX actuator controls the opening and closing travel of valves and other actuated devices. OPEN and CLOSED limits are protected by an absolute encoder that provides optical sensing of valve position and measures valve position in both motor and handwheel operation.

No battery or backup power supply is required. Output torque is derived from motor speed, temperature, and voltage. If the preset torque is exceeded, the motor shuts off. As a result of this reliable and advanced protection technology, all valve and other actuated devices are protected from potential damage from overload, improper seating, and foreign obstructions.

A range of control and network options is available and can be easily added to the control capabilities already available on a standard actuator.

You can download the Limitorque MX Electronic Actuator User Instructions, Maintenance, and Spare Parts Manual in PDF version from the Swanson Flo site here (8.5MB), or read the embedded version below.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Turbine Flow Meters

Turbine flow meters
Turbine flow meters (Badger Meter / Blancett)
Turbine flow meters are process instruments used in a variety of industrial applications to measure the flow of a fluids. These types of flowmeters operate under the simple principle that the rotation of the turbine will be constant as the turbine is acted upon by a fluid passing through the flowmeter.

Turbine flow meters use the mechanical energy of the fluid to rotate a turbine blade in the flow stream and provide precise and accurate flow measurement. The flow impinging upon the turbine blades causes the rotor to spin. The angular velocity of a turbine flow meter is proportional to flow rate. The rotational velocity of the turbine is interpreted as an electrical frequency output through the use of magnetic pick-ups. As each turbine blade passes by the magnetic pick-up coil, a voltage pulse is generated which is a measure of the flow rate. The total number of pulses gives a measure of the total flow which can be totalized with a maximum error of a single pulse.

The relationship of the angle of the turbine meter blades to the flow stream governs the angular velocity and the output frequency of the meter. The sharper the angle of the turbine blade, the higher the frequency output.

Easy to maintain while also boasting reliability, turbine flow meters are known to be cost-effective solutions that make an ideal device for measuring flow rate. Aside from excellent rangeability, they also provide high response rate and high accuracy compared to other available types of flow meters. Turbine flow meters are sturdy, need very little maintenance, and seldom exhibit much deviation in performance.

Turbine flow meters
Turbine flow meters (Hoffer Flow Controls)
These meters are used in multiple industries to reliably measure the velocity of a variety of liquids, gases and vapors over a very broad range of flow rates, temperatures, and viscosities. Turbine flow meters are used to provide measurement information in cryogenic applications, crude oil production, chemical processing, blending systems, storage, off-loading, product loading, and many other applications across many industries.

Advantages:
  • Accuracy
  • Excellent repeatability and range
  • External power not required
  • Good fro cryogenic applications
  • Good for extreme pressures and temperatures
  • Easy to install
Disadvantages
  • Material availability
  • Not recommended for contaminated media or slurries
  • Error due to wear
For information on any flow control application, contact Swanson Flo by calling 800-288-7926 or visit https://swansonflo.com.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Disassembly, Repair, and Rebuild of the Jordan Mark 78 Control Valve

Jordan Mark 78 Control Valve
The Jordan Mark 78 pneumatic control valve is designed for accurate performance and simplified maintenance. This versatile product can be used on a variety of applications, including viscous/corrosive liquids, process gases or steam in process or utility service.
  • Shutoff: ANSI Class IV or VI
  • Sizes: 1/2" – 2" (DN15 – DN50)
  • End Connections: Threaded, Flanged, Socket Weld, Butt-Weld
  • Body Materials: Bronze, Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel
  • Cv (Kv): up to 50 (up to 43)
  • Trim Materials: Stainless Steel, Monel, Hastelloy C, Alloy 20
  • Seat: ANSI Class IV (Hard Seat); ANSI Class VI Teflon (Soft Seat)
  • Control Ranges: 3-15 psi, 6-30 psi or split ranges (0,2-1,0 bar, 0,4-2,1 bar)
The video below provides a detailed demonstration of how to disassemble, repair, and rebuild the Mark 78 control valve.

800-288-7926 

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Understanding Explosion Proof Enclosures Used in Process Control

This is a short video that explains what an explosion-proof enclosure is, what defines it as “explosion-proof”, and the principle behind why its safe to use in explosive or combustible atmospheres.

“Explosion-proof" doesn't mean the enclosure can withstand the forces of an external explosion. It means that the enclosure is designed to cool any escaping hot gases (caused by an internal ignition) sufficiently enough as to prevent the ignition of combustible gases or dusts in the surrounding area.

https://swansonflo.com
800-288-7926

Friday, February 16, 2018

Introduction to Industrial Control Systems

Industrial Control Systems Control systems are computer-based systems that are used by many infrastructures and industries to monitor and control sensitive processes and physical functions. Typically, control systems collect sensor measurements and operational data from the field, process and display this information, and relay control commands to local or remote equipment. In the electric power industry they can manage and control the transmission and delivery of electric power, for example, by opening and closing circuit breakers and setting thresholds for preventive shutdowns. Employing integrated control systems, the oil and gas industry can control the refining operations on a plant site as well as remotely monitor the pressure and flow of gas pipelines and control the flow and pathways of gas transmission. In water utilities, they can remotely monitor well levels and control the wells’ pumps; monitor flows, tank levels, or pressure in storage tanks; monitor water quality characteristics, such as pH, turbidity, and chlorine residual; and control the addition of chemicals. Control system functions vary from simple to complex; they can be used to simply monitor processes—for example, the environmental conditions in a small office building—or manage most activities in a municipal water system or even a nuclear power plant.

Industrial Control SystemsIn certain industries such as chemical and power generation, safety systems are typically implemented to mitigate a disastrous event if control and other systems fail. In addition, to guard against both physical attack and system failure, organizations may establish back-up control centers that include uninterruptible power supplies and backup generators.

There are two primary types of control systems. Distributed Control Systems (DCS) typically are Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems typically are used for large, geographically dispersed distribution operations. A utility company may use a DCS to generate power and a SCADA system to distribute it.

process instruments
Field devices and discreet controllers used in control systems
(Foxboro Schneider Electric).
A control system typically consists of a “master” or central supervisory control and monitoring station consisting of one or more human-machine interfaces where an operator can view status information about the remote sites and issue commands directly to the system. Typically, this station is located at a main site along with application servers and an engineering workstation that is used to configure and troubleshoot the other control system components. The supervisory control and monitoring station is typically connected to local controller stations through a hard- wired network or to remote controller stations through a communications network—which could be the Internet, a public switched telephone network, or a cable or wireless (e.g. radio, microwave, or Wi-Fi) network. Each controller station has a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), DCS controller, or other controller that communicates with the supervisory control and monitoring station. The controller stations also include sensors and control equipment that connect directly with the working components of the infrastructure—for example, pipelines, water towers, and power lines. The sensor takes readings from the infrastructure equipment—such as water or pressure levels, electrical voltage or current—and sends a message to the controller. The controller may be programmed to determine a course of action and send a message to the control equipment instructing it what to do—for example, to turn off a valve or dispense a chemical. If the controller is not programmed to determine a course of action, the controller communicates with the supervisory control and monitoring station before sending a command back to the control equipment. The control system also can be programmed to issue alarms back to the operator when certain conditions are detected. Handheld devices, such as personal digital assistants, can be used to locally monitor controller stations. Experts report that technologies in controller stations are becoming more intelligent and automated and communicate with the supervisory central monitoring and control station less frequently, requiring less human intervention.

Swanson Flo can help you with control system questions or challenges. Reach them by calling 800-288-7926 or visiting https://swansonflo.com.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Foxboro Magnetic Flowmeter for Chemical and Process Industries

MagPlus
Based on Faraday’s law of induction, Foxboro magnetic meters are a reliable  ow measurement solution with a lower cost of ownership and maintenance, as well as  eld-proven stability to maximize the availability of  ow measurement.

With a wide range of liners and electrodes, the 9700A  owtube is ideal for the Chemical and Process industries. In combination with the IMT30A, IMT31A and IMT33A transmitters, Foxboro offers an innovative solution designed to meet the demands for all chemical applications such as:
  • Clean liquids
  • Mixing of chemicals
  • Demanding applications including corrosive, abrasive liquids • Rapid variation of the pH value
  • For slurries and pastes with high solids content
  • Drilling applications, mining slurries with large particles

See the embedded brochure below, or download your own PDF from this Swanson Flo link.