Friday, June 23, 2017

Lined Industrial Valves for Corrosive Service

Lined Industrial Valve
Lined Valve (ITT Engineered Valve - Cam-Line)
Lined valves use a fluoropolymer, plastic, or ceramic lining applied to all wetted internal parts of the valve.

Lined valves combine the excellent mechanical properties of metallic bodies with the corrosion resistance of fluorocarbons, such as PFA and PTFE.

Lining the intricately shaped inside surfaces of a valve is certainly an engineering challenge, especially to achieve a uniform thickness and the highest lining quality, without cavities or inclusions.

The special lining process guarantees tight bonding between the lining and the inside of the body. This effectively prevents the lining from shearing off the body in part or being removed completely.

Ideal applications include highly corrosive applications within the chemical processing industry such as sulfuric and hydrochloric acid.

Lined ball valves are ideally suited for corrosive applications, requiring very reliable performance, tight shutoff, constant torque and no maintenance. These valves have gained extensive usage in many industries including power generation, pulp and paper, refineries, chemical process, pharmaceutical/bioprocessing and pollution control.

For more information on lined valves, visit Swanson Flo at http://www.swansonflo.com or call 800-288-7926.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Magnetic Flowmeters (Magmeters): Principles and Applications

Magnetic flowmeter
Magnetic flowmeter (Foxboro)
Crucial aspects of process control include the ability to accurately determine qualities and quantities of materials. In terms of appraising and working with fluids (such as liquids, steam, and gases) the flowmeter is a staple tool, with the simple goal of expressing the delivery of a subject fluid in a quantified manner. Measurement of media flow velocity can be used, along with other conditions, to determine volumetric or mass flow. The magnetic flowmeter, also called a Magmeter, is one of several technologies used to measure fluid flow.

In general, magnetic flowmeters are sturdy, reliable devices able to withstand hazardous environments while returning precise measurements to operators of a wide variety of processes. The magnetic flowmeter has no moving parts. The operational principle of the device is powered by Faraday's Law, a fundamental scientific understanding which states that a voltage will be induced across any conductor moving at a right angle through a magnetic field, with the voltage being proportional to the velocity of the conductor. The principle allows for an inherently hard-to-measure quality of a substance to be expressed via the Magmeter. In a Magmeter application, the meter produces the magnetic field referred to in Faraday's Law. The conductor is the fluid. The actual measurement of a magnetic flowmeter is the induced voltage corresponding to fluid velocity. This can be used to determine volumetric flow and mass flow when combined with other measurements.

The magnetic flowmeter technology is not impacted by temperature, pressure, or density of the subject fluid. It is however, necessary to fill the entire cross section of the pipe in order to derive useful volumetric flow measurements. Faraday's Law relies on conductivity, so the fluid being measured has to be electrically conductive. Many hydrocarbons are not sufficiently conductive for a flow measurement using this method, nor are gases.

Magmeters apply Faraday's law by using two charged magnetic coils; fluid passes through the magnetic field produced by the coils. A precise measurement of the voltage generated in the fluid will be proportional to fluid velocity. The relationship between voltage and flow is theoretically a linear expression, yet some outside factors may present barriers and complications in the interaction of the instrument with the subject fluid. These complications include a higher amount of voltage in the liquid being processed, and coupling issues between the signal circuit, power source, and/or connective leads of both an inductive and capacitive nature.

In addition to salient factors such as price, accuracy, ease of use, and the size-scale of the flowmeter in relation to the fluid system, there are multiple reasons why Magmeters are the unit of choice for certain applications. They are resistant to corrosion, and can provide accurate measurement of dirty fluids - making them suitable for wastewater measurement. As mentioned, there are no moving parts in a Magmeter, keeping maintenance to a minimum. Power requirements are also low. Instruments are available in a wide range of configurations, sizes, and construction materials to accommodate various process installation requirements.

As with all process measurement instruments, proper selection, configuration, and installation are the real keys to a successful project. Share your flow measurement challenges of all types with a process measurement specialist, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

The video below provides additional information about magnetic flowmeters.


Sunday, May 21, 2017

Your Partner for Process Control Automation: Swanson Flo

Founded in 1960, Swanson Flo has long maintained our position as an industry leader in process automation with unmatched project success leveraging industry preferred products and services.

Our mission is to provide innovative process control solutions for engineers, managers and maintenance professionals through quality equipment and experienced application engineering. These efforts combined with excellent aftermarket service yield reduced operating costs and improved production. Visit http://www.swansonflo.com or call 800-288-7926.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Ashcroft Awards Swanson Flo Coveted "Distributor of Distinction Award"

For the fourth consecutive year, pressure and temperature instrument manufacturer Ashcroft, Inc. named Swanson Flo of Plymouth Minnesota the Ashcroft "Distributor of Distinction" for 2016. This award recognizes and honors Ashcroft Distributors who deliver exceptional growth, revenue, and commitment, and stands as Ashcroft's most respected and highest honor for their Distributors.

Swanson stood out from the pack in 2016 with a 17% increase in bookings over their previous year, despite a very tough economy for industrial distribution. Swanson Flo attributes the increase to their focus on developing new business at targeted accounts, increasing the size of their sales force, and turning up new applications at existing accounts.

From left to right:  Bill Johnson, Sales Manager, Western Division;
Robbin Jensen, Insides Sales Manager; Tom Howe, Owner/CEO,
Sandy Grinvalds, Ashcroft; and Sid Sondag, Director Sales & Marketing.

Friday, May 12, 2017

The Advantages of the Sliding Gate Control Valve Seat in Process Control

Sliding Gate Control Valve Seat
Sliding Gate Control Valve Seat (Jordan)
Fluid flow control in a process can present a number of challenges, large and small. In addition to selecting a properly sized control valve, your choice of trim design can contribute noticeably to overall positive performance. One candidate for fluid flow control is the sliding gate valve.

The trim of a sliding gate valve essentially consists of a fixed disc and a movable plate installed directly in the flow path. The disc and plate have precisely located and sized perforations, slots, or other openings. The valve actuation mechanism slides the plate across the face of the disc, progressively changing the alignment of the openings in the plate and fixed disc. This type of design can bring some benefits to the process and user:

  • Short stroke length provides fast response, reduces wear on packing and diaphragm, allows for a compact installed assembly
  • Straight-through flow pattern reduces turbulence, noise, erosion, valve chatter, and cavitation
  • Ease of maintenance, with fewer trim components that are easily changed
  • Self cleaning, self lapping seats

The video below provides a clear illustration of how the sliding gate valve trim works, through animation and exploded views of the valve components. Share your fluid flow control challenges with a valve specialist and combine your process expertise with their product application knowledge for an effective solution.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Continuous Non-contact Level Measurement for Process Control

LLT 100 Laser Level Transmitter
LLT 100 Laser Level
Transmitter
ABB has released the new Model LLT 100 Laser Level Transmitter, which provides continuous non-contact level measurement for process automation and inventory management across a broad range of industrial applications.

The new transmitter provides reliable level measurement of solids or liquids, even clear liquids. The laser ranging technology is packaged with features required by industrial applications. Currently, three variants include housings for general industrial applications, as well as another for high pressure and one for hygienic installation.

The video blow provides a clear overview of the benefits that accrue from selecting this technology for your next project. More information is available from application specialists, with whom you should share your requirements and challenges to develop effective solutions.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Protect Your Instrumentation with Diaphragm Seals

Flanged diaphragm seal
Flanged diaphragm seal
(Ashcroft)
Pressure measurement is a common element of industrial operations and control systems. Fluid processing can often involve media that is potentially harmful to pressure sensing devices. The media may be corrosive to the sensor material, or other media properties may impact the performance or usable life of the instrument. In process control environments, diaphragm seals play a role in protecting items like pressure sensors from damage by process fluids.

The diaphragm seal is a flexible membrane that seals across the connecting path to a sensor and isolates the sensor from the process media. System pressure crosses the barrier without inhibition, enabling accurate measurement, but the process fluid does not. Typical materials composing diaphragm seals are elastomers, with a wide variety of specific materials available to accommodate almost every application.

In the operating principle of the diaphragm seal, the sealed chamber created between the diaphragm and the instrument is filled with an appropriate fluid, allowing for the transfer of pressure from the process media to the protected sensor. The seals are attached to the process by threaded, open flange, sanitary, or other connections.  Diaphragm seals are sometimes referred to as chemical seals or gauge guards. Stainless steel, Hastelloy, Monel, Inconel, and titanium are used in high pressure environments, and some materials are known to work better when paired with certain chemicals.
Threaded diaphragm seal
Threaded diaphragm seal

Sanitary processes, such as food, beverage, and pharmaceuticals, use diaphragm seals to prevent the accumulation of process fluid in pressure ports, a possible source of contamination. If such a buildup were to occur, such as milk invading and lodging in a port on a pressure gauge, the resulting contamination compromises the quality and purity of successive batches. Extremely pure process fluids, like ultra-pure water, could be contaminated by the metal surface of a process sensor. Some pneumatic systems rely on the elimination of even the smallest pressure fluctuations, and diaphragm seals prevent those by ensuring the separation of the process materials from the sensors.

Sanitary diaphragm seal with gauge
Sanitary diaphragm
seal with pressure gauge.
Diaphragm seals are not without some application concerns, and devices are now built to address and counter many potential issues related to the use of diaphragm seals with process monitoring instruments and equipment. Products seek to eliminate any and all dead space, allow for continuous process flow, and are self-cleaning thanks to continuous flow design. Some high pressure seals come equipped with anti-clogging features, accomplished by the elimination of internal cavities while protecting gauges. Multi-purpose seals reduce temperature influence and improve instrument performance while pinpointing and diffusing areas of high stress. These pre-emptive measures result
in longer instrument life-cycles and improved performance while ensuring protection from corrosion.

There are numerous options and available diaphragm seal variants. Share your application specifics with a product specialist, combining your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.